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    Autism Therapies & services Therapies & interventions Early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder: getting started 0-18 years A A Share  Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) benefit from early intervention – the earlier, the better. It’s important that you do as much as you can for your child, as soon as you can. But if you’re still reeling from a diagnosis, it can be hard to know where and how to start. Early intervention for autism spectrum disorder What to look for in an early intervention for autism spectrum disorder Getting started with early intervention service providers Choosing trustworthy early intervention service providers How to find out more about early intervention People living in National Disability Insurance Scheme roll out areas have different intervention and support options from those outside the roll out areas. If you live in a roll out area, your child will get early intervention through the NDIS. Early intervention for autism spectrum disorder Early intervention refers to doing things as early as possible to work on your child’s autism spectrum disorder (ASD) characteristics. Early intervention for children with ASD is made up of therapies or interventions and services. Therapies (also called interventions) are the programs or sessions aimed at helping your child’s development. Services are the places and organisations that offer these therapies. A service might offer one therapy or several types of therapies. Starting intervention as young as possible is most effective in helping the development of children with ASD. You can even get things started before your child has a formal diagnosis. For example, problems with communication are a big cause of tantrums and other difficult behaviour for children with ASD. If children can’t communicate their needs or understand others, they express themselves or get attention with difficult behaviour. But if they learn to communicate effectively as early as possible, they won’t need to behave like this quite so much. Another reason for starting early is that it can help children with early brain development – the brains of children with ASD develop differently from their peers. What to look for in an early intervention for autism spectrum disorder All therapies and services for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) should be family centred, well structured and based on good evidence. Here’s a list of things to look for when choosing an early intervention. The more of these things you find in a service the better, but not all interventions will do all these things. Family-centred  The intervention or service: includes family members so you can work alongside the professionals and learn how to help your child is flexible – it can be offered at home as well as in other settings like kindergartens and early intervention centres provides your family with support and guidance. Well-structured  The intervention or service: has staff who are specially trained in the intervention and services they provide develops an individual plan for your child and reviews the plan regularly monitors your child’s progress with regular assessments is highly structured, well organised, regular and predictable provides a supportive learning environment – your child feels comfortable and supported prepares and supports your child for the move to school enables contact between your child and typically developing children (ideally of the same age). Evidence-based  The intervention or service: is designed for children with ASD  focuses on developing attention, communication, listening, imitation, language and social skills includes strategies to help your child learn new skills and use them in different settings (sometimes called ‘generalising’ skills) identifies what the ‘purpose’ of a difficult behaviour is, and teaches your child more appropriate alternative behaviour to replace it. You can print out a checklist of these characteristics of a good early intervention service (PDF: 39kb). Other things to consider  Intensive early intervention for children with ASD is most effective. It’s not just about the hours, though – it’s also about the quality of those hours and how the therapy engages your child. It can be scary when you first find out what an early intervention therapy or service costs in time and money. Still, try not to panic. Instead try to focus on what you want for your child and your family. Learn all you can about the available options. How will they help your child? What will they cost in dollars and time? What funding is available to help cover these costs? Different children with ASD respond in different ways to interventions, so no single program will suit all children and their families.  Video Finding and starting early intervention for autism spectrum disorder In this short video, parents talk about finding and starting early intervention for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They share their experiences with interventions and tests. There are many excellent resources and interventions available, but these parents say it’s important to choose interventions based on scientific evidence. Getting started with early intervention service providers To begin with, find out all you can about your early intervention options. Three questions will help you get started: What did the professionals who diagnosed your child recommend? The assessment or diagnosis should help you understand your child’s current skills and possible gaps in skills or development. It should also include a treatment plan you can take to service providers. What relevant service providers are in your area? You can get a list of local services from your autism advisor. What do you know about the interventions these service providers offer? Learn more about types of interventions. Choosing trustworthy early intervention service providers The most important thing.... How to find out more about early intervention If you need more information about a service you’re considering, try the following: 936541055, +919008361473, 9738838733...
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    Learn to play , 😍 play to learn 🤩  SOCIAL SKILLS GROUP THERAPY Friendships and positive peer relationships are an extremely important part of a child’s healthy development. Consequently, social rejection and lack of peer support can be a devastating experience for children and adolescents, impacting their school functioning and even future relationships. Social Skills Group Therapy consists of small groups of three to six children, ranging in ages 4 to 16. Children are grouped by age and ability and therapy consists of interactive group activities aimed at developing skills and confidence based on each child’s strengths and weaknesses within a supportive peer context. While each group is uniquely designed and scheduled in accordance with the selected participants, sessions typically run weekly for an 8-week period and meet for an hour to 1 1/2 hours, and include a parent feedback/training component throughout the sessions. All groups are led by a clinical psychologist and co-therapist. Social Skills Groups are generally appropriate for children with difficulties in the following areas: shyness, social isolation, adjustment disorders, ADHD, learning disorders and other social or behavioral difficulties. Special groups are arranged for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). Research shows that social skills training can help children progress across various areas of functioning by: Building Self-Esteem/Confidence Communicating Effectively Reading Social Cues Increasing Problem-Solving Understanding Perspective Taking Managing Stress/Anxiety Emphasizing Cooperation Child Early Intervention Sri prakruthi UPCOMING EVENTS Health is wealth events. View Calendar THERAPY DEPARTMENTS Behaviour intervention Group intervention Home schooling Shadow services Speech Academics Play therapy Physio Sensory FOUNDERS’ MESSAGE Welcome to Child Early Intervention Medical Center (CEIMC) and Child Learning and Enrichment Medical Center (CLEMC). We would like to welcome you, not only as professionals, but as parents as well. We understand the frustration and stress that affects every family with a child on the autism spectrum or with developmental delays. CONTACT US Sri prakruthi 9738838733/9008361473/9036541055
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    Autism What Is Autism? Within the sectionWhat is autism? About autism Fact Sheets Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Indicators of ASD in young children Home What is autism? What Is Autism? Autism is a lifelong developmental condition that affects, among other things, the way an individual relates to his or her environment and their interaction with other people. The word 'spectrum' describes the range of difficulties that people on the autism spectrum may experience and the degree to which they may be affected. Some people may be able to live relatively normal lives, while others may have an accompanying learning challenges and require continued specialist support. The main areas of difficulty are in social communication, social interaction and restricted or repetitive behaviours and interests. People on the autism spectrum may also have: unusual sensory interests such as sniffing objects or staring intently at moving objects sensory sensitivities including avoiding everyday sounds and textures such as hair dryers, vacuum cleaners and sand intellectual impairment or learning difficulties An estimated one in 100 people has autism; that’s almost 230, 000 Australians. Autism affects almost four times as many boys than girls. For an interesting read on the perceived increase in the prevlence and/or diagnosis of Autism,  click here to read a Blog by Vicki Gibbs, Aspect National Manager of Research and Assessments.   Looking for more information? Download our quick guide to autism. Read More   “ What would happen if the autism gene was eliminated from the gene pool? You would have a bunch of people standing around in a cave, chatting and socializing and not getting anything done. ”— Temple Grandin Browse Related research Early intervention focus All research evidence supports that early intervention makes a significant difference for children with autism. Getting the news that your child has autism can be confronting, and families need help to be able to support their child, explains Aspect Senior Manager Early Intervention, Rachel Kerslake." Download Aspect Practice Conversations 5 newsletter and podcast which focuses on Early Intervention. No upcoming related events found. © 2018 Autism Spectrum
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    Play and children with autism .... Play helps children develop gross and fine motor skills, language and communication skills, thinking and problem-solving skills, and social skills. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can affect how play develops, but there’s a lot you can do to help develop your child’s play skills.. How autism spectrum disorder can affect play Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) enjoy playing, but they can find some types of play difficult. It’s common for them to have very limited play, play with only a few toys, or play in a repetitive way. For example, your child might like spinning the wheels on a car and watching the wheels rotate, or might complete a puzzle in the same order every time. Because ASD affects the development of social skills and communication skills, it can also affect the development of important play skills, like the ability to: copy simple actions explore the environment share objects and attention with others imagine what other people are thinking and feeling respond to others take turns. But your child can learn and develop the skills needed for play, and you can help. Playing with your child is also a great way to connect with her at her level. It’s OK if your child has only a few play interests at the moment – you can use your child’s favourite toys and topics to expand his play. For example, if your child enjoys Thomas the Tank Engine, use Thomas-themed toys to gradually introduce new toys and activities – for example, you could introduce a drawing game or activity involving Thomas. Types of play skills for children with autism spectrum disorder Young children engage in six main types of play, which develop in stages. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might need extra help at each stage. Exploratory play   This is when children explore objects and toys, rather than playing with them – for example, feeling a teddy bear, mouthing a block or looking at a doll’s hands. At this stage of play, children are learning about their world through different shapes, colours, sizes and textures. You can help your child with ASD by modelling this type of play and by encouraging her to explore objects around her. For example, you could encourage her to splash water in the bath and rub soap between her fingers. Cause-and-effect play   This is when children play with toys that need an action to produce the desired result – for example, pressing a button to play music, or winding up a jack-in-the-box. This type of play teaches children that their actions have effects and gives them a sense of control in their play. Your child with ASD might learn to operate toys on his own, through exploratory play, or you might need to show him. Praising your child when he does the right action will encourage him to keep doing it. It will also encourage him to interact with other toys in a cause-and-effect way as well. This is also a good opportunity to teach your child how to ask you for help, and to play by taking turns. For example, you could take turns pressing a button to make something pop up and take turns pushing it back down again. Toy play (or ‘functional’ play)  This is learning how to play with and use toys in the way they were designed – for example, pushing a toy car, bringing a toy phone to the ear, or throwing a ball. If this is an area of challenge for your child with ASD, the following ideas might help: Sit in front of your child so she can look at you, communicate with you, and see what you’re doing. This also makes it easier to engage her in play. Offer two or three toys your child enjoys. This gives your child a choice without overwhelming him. Join in with what your child is doing, rather than trying to guide her play. You can start by copying what your child is doing, then add to the activity. For example, if your child is spinning the wheels of a car, you could spin them too. Then turn the car the right way up and run it along the floor saying, ‘Brrm, brrm’. Or if your child likes opening and closing doors on toys, start with this and then add toy figures walking in the doors. Encourage your child to playif he doesn’t copy you. You could do this by saying, ‘Your turn to drive the car’, taking your child’s hand and placing it on the car, then moving it across the floor together. Reward your child. Use praise and positive feedback like ‘You’ve built a big tower. Good job!’. You could also add other rewards, like a couple of turns of blowing bubbles. Knowing when to stop or change is also important, so look out for signs of boredom or lack of interest. Show your child short videos of people playing. This can give her ideas of what she could do with those toys.  Look out for signs that your child is getting bored or losing interest – knowing when to stop or change is important. The ability to play with toys – and to play with you – is an important stepping stone towards the types and stages of play described below. Constructive play  This is when children build or make things. It involves working towards a goal or product – for example, completing a jigsaw puzzle, making a tower out of blocks, or drawing a picture. Some children with ASD might have delays in this area of play, whereas others will progress much like typically developing children. Sometimes children with ASD excel at a skill like completing jigsaws, building Lego or drawing. For children with ASD, you can encourage constructive play by showing your child what to do. You could try building a tower with blocks to show your child how to do it, or you could use pictures or photographs that show how to build a tower. Physical play  This is rough-and-tumble play, running around, and other physical play that provides whole-body exercise and helps your child develop gross motor skills. Physical play gives all children the experience of interacting with other people and objects in their surroundings. You can find information about how to encourage this kind of play in our articles on outdoor play,  movement for toddlers,  movement for preschoolers and movement for school-age children. Pretend play  This is when children pretend and use their imaginations during play. Examples of this type of play include pretending to feed a teddy bear, dressing up like a superhero, pretending to be driving the car, or pretending the couch is a sailing boat. Pretend play happens later in development – usually around two years of age in typically developing children. It’s the most sophisticated form of play. Pretend play is particularly important for developing the skills needed for social relationships, language and communication. This type of play is often delayed in children with ASD, but many children with ASD can and do ultimately develop pretend play. There are lots of simple, everyday pretend actions your child can learn to use in pretend play, like driving a car, riding a horse or banging a drum. Once your child can do some pretend actions, you can develop his imaginative and pretend play skills by breaking the pretend play activity into steps. You can also use written or picture instructions to help your child understand what to do. You might want to make it funny – for example, try using a hair brush instead of a spoon to feed a teddy bear. You can also encourage your child to join in with a fun game of ‘let’s pretend’. This type of play also includes role-play. You can encourage role-play by taking your child’s favourite story and getting her and others to act it out. You can give the children costumes and suggest changes to the characters’ voices and gestures. By slowly introducing new themes and gradually changing parts of the play, you can guide your child towards independent creative dramatic play.  Social play skills for children with autism spectrum disorder Along with the six types of play above, there is social play – the ability to play with others.  Social play also follows developmental stages, but playing with others can be particularly challenging for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You can help your child by noting what stage of social play he’s at and by providing opportunities, support and encouragement for him to progress to the next one. The stages are outlined below. Note that even as children develop through the stages of social play, they’re likely to want to spend time playing by themselves as well as playing alongside others. It’s OK if your child wants to play alone some of the time. Playing alone (solitary play)  This is when children play alone and independently, when they don’t try to get close to other children and don’t pay attention to what others are doing. For children with ASD, you can encourage solitary play skills by starting with activities that have a clear goal and ending. Keep the play short to begin with, so your child can finish the activity quickly and feel successful. For example, you might choose a simple jigsaw puzzle. Playing alongside (parallel play)  Children at this stage of play start to play alongside other children, and might use the same or similar toys as those around them. You can promote play in this stage by encouraging your child with ASD to play at an activity − like trains − on her own but alongside other children. You can encourage your child to imitate the other children’s play while she’s playing on her own.  Playing and sharing with others (associative play)  In this stage of play, children interact with other children – giving, taking and sharing play materials. This usually starts at around three years of age in typically developing children. You can help your child with ASD learn skills for associative play by encouraging him to swap things while he’s still playing on his own – for example, swapping bikes, trikes or scooters when cycling or scooting with other children. Playing and cooperating (cooperative play)  Playing cooperatively with others includes playing games with rules, making up rules, and working together on something, like building a cubby house or making a sandcastle. Cooperative play can become quite complex and involves communication skills. Many of the social rules in this stage of play can be difficult for children with ASD to understand. You can help your child by using clear instructions to simplify the rules of games. For example, ‘First you hide somewhere in the house. Then Sam counts to 10. Then Sam comes to find you. When Sam finds you, it’s your turn to count while Sam hides’. It can also help to explain the rules using pictures or Social Stories™. Making games more visual can also help – for example, you can mark the person who is ‘it’ with a special hat.  Encouraging play with others for children with autism spectrum disorder Once your child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has a range of play skills or is beginning to play with and take notice of other children, you can help her learn how to interact and play with others. Simple games are a good way to build social interaction in play as well as turn-taking skills. Games like peek-a-boo, pat-a-cake and ring-o-rosies are all social. Playing interactive games like snap or memory with cards can also be helpful because they’re structured and have a defined end. Here are some other ideas to get your child interacting and playing with others: Use play dates or visits with friends or family whose children are around the same age as your child. You could also ask your child’s siblings or cousins to help with showing your child how to play games, take turns and so on. Teach your child how to join in. Again, siblings, friends and cousins might be able to show your child how it’s done. If other children ignore your child, watch carefully and see whether you can work out why. Does your child need to work on a skill that you can help him learn? You could speak to your child’s school, preschool or early intervention teacher if you’re not sure. Early childhood workers have lots of skills for helping children learn to play together. Like typically developing children, children with ASD have a range of thinking and learning styles and strengths that they can build on. For example, they’re often visual learners, so you can work with this strength and help your child by taking pictures of the different steps in a game or activity.  Making the most of play with your child with autism spectrum disorder Once your child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can play with you and is playing with toys, you can use play to build skills in other areas. For example, you might focus on rewarding certain skills like taking turns, playing for longer periods of time, or choosing a variety of toys to play with. Here are some tips for making the most of play in this way. These tips apply to all kinds of play – toy play, playing with others and pretend play: Talk about what’s going on while your child plays. If you’re playing a pretend game like a tea party, use the names of objects, like cup, spoon and plate. You can also give words to the things you and your child are doing, like ‘pour drink’ or ‘feed teddy’. Help your child build longer sentences. If your child is speaking only in single words, you could try using two words. If she’s using three-word sentences, you can use four words, and so on. This way you’re not using language that’s too hard for your child, but you’re building her language and vocabulary. Encourage play skills in different environments. For example, if your child likes playing with Lego at home, encourage him to play with Lego at a friend’s house. Reward your child for using his play skills in different places and with different people. Use everyday activities as opportunities for play. Any time there can be joint activity between your child and another person is a potential chance for play. You can also build playtime into everyday routines like bath time. Use play to help your child respond appropriately to social situations that she might find challenging, like understanding sharing, turn-taking, and compromising. For example, you could use a tea party game to help your child understand sharing food and taking turns to pour a drink with the jug. Use play to help your child develop everyday skills. For example, dressing a doll or changing in and out of dress-ups can help your child learn to dress himself. Watch your child throughout the day and try to ‘catch’ the times when she shows interest in an activity, however mundane it might seem to you. These are the perfect times to teach and learn.
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    Hope for every child, every family.™ ABA Explained Home > ABA Explained Applied Behavior Analysis is a type of intensive therapy that focuses on the principles and techniques of learning theory to help improve social behavior. ABA therapy helps to (1) develop new skills, (2) shape and refine previously learned skills, and (3) decrease socially significant problem behaviors. ABA is a scientifically validated approach to understanding learning and behavior by looking at the function of the behavior and the environment in which it occurs. Anything a person does is a behavior (talking, eating, coloring, tying shoes, etc.) and ABA looks at the purpose behind those actions and under what circumstances they occur, in order to change them or teach new, more functional ways of doing something. For example, if a child screams when eating lunch, ABA would look at the environment around him to determine why he is screaming and then determine what would be a more appropriate way of getting that same thing.  The principles of ABA have been applied since the early 1960’s with both children and adults with developmental disorders. Today there are a wide variety of ABA techniques that have been developed to help learners develop and build functional skills. ABA is the only therapy that has been endorsed by the U.S. Surgeon General as an effective treatment for autism. ABA is also endorsed by a number of other federal and state agencies. The United States has seen a dramatic increase in the use of Applied Behavior Analysis to help those with autism live functional, productive, and happy lives. This approach focuses on the function of one’s verbal speech, Using this VB approach is gives the team a way to functionally teach essential language skills in a systematic way. ABA therapy at LAC is conducted in a 1:1 setting (1 therapist working with 1 child). Each child goes through an in depth assessment conducted by a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) and other clinical team members to determine their current skill set and what skills might be improved upon.  Parents are an integral part of the assessment process. You input is vital and integrated into the individualized therapy program, designed specifically for your child. LAC is a team and the family unit is an integral part of making our team work! One of the reasons ABA therapy is so effective is that it systematically looks at the basics of learning and then builds upon them. The therapists and clinical team look closely at the skills your child has and needs to work on, building a plan tailored to their needs and learning style. Our therapists look at your child’s needs, skills, interests, preferences, and family environment. This means that the ABA program that your child is following will look different than the program of another child. Goals are determined based on this plan and once a goal is met, the team moves on to the next step. It’s all about breaking things down into teachable steps, and then building on them to make your child as independent as possible. For example, if the team determines that an appropriate goal for your child is to tie his/her own shoes, they might start with going and finding his/her own shoes. Once that it mastered, it will be find them and put them on independently. Following that, the next step might be to cross the strings. This would continue until the child is independently completing all steps of the show tying process. These steps will be different for every child, but the concept is the same, start at the beginning and build from there. ABA Techniques and Principles Foster Basic Skills as Well as More Complex Skills: Listening Looking Imitating Conversing Self Help Skills Daily Living Skills Although every child’s program is unique, there are some commonalities among all programs at LAC: Qualified, trained, and experienced behavior analyst (BCBA) designs and directly oversees a child’s intervention The therapy program designed by our clinical team comes from a detailed assessment of a child’s skills and preferences as well as some family goals Treatment instruction and goals are developmentally appropriate and focus on a broad range of skills, such as: sociability, communication, play, self-care, leisure, academic skills and motor development Therapy goals emphasize skills that enable learners to become independent and successful now and for life Instruction plans break down skills into skill sets and are taught from the most basic to the more complex There is constant ongoing objective measurement of the child’s progress The clinical team frequently reviews the child’s progress and data to make empirically based program adjustments Regular meetings with family and staff take place to allow for planning, review of child’s progress and to make any needed adjustments The instructor will use a variety of different behavior analytic techniques, some will be directed by the instructor and some will be initiated by the child. At LAC, your child’s day is very structured to provide many learning opportunities – these are both planned and naturally occurring. This allows the child to acquire and practice skills in both unstructured and structured situations. This allows for your child to learn how to generalize the skills they learn with us into their everyday lives. We also work with families on training and transferring skills into the home setting. More information on Applied Behavioral Analysis is available at:Sri prakruthi..... website
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    Call Us Today! 9036541055/9008361473 SRI PRAKRUTHI Has your child been diagnosed with Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Aspergers? Are you looking for a Natural Cure for Autism or Alternative Treatment for Autism? If your answers are ‘yes’, read this most exhaustive guide on Autism Spectrum Disorder, its causes, symptoms and homeopathy treatment options.   What is Autism? Autism is a disorder in which children have impaired or poor communication and social skills. It usually becomes apparent within first three years of life but some mild cases get diagnosed during early schooling. People often confuse the meaning of autism with a psychiatric illness. However,  Autism is a disorder of neural development characterized by impaired social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication, and by restricted or repetitive behaviour.  But many parents feel that their kids start showing autistic traits suddenly after a period of normal development. What is Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)? Autism meaning: a mental condition, present from early childhood, characterized by great difficulty in communicating and forming relationships with other people and in using language and abstract concepts. The autism spectrum disorder describes a range of conditions classified as pervasive developmental. ASD includes autism, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS]. These disorders are characterized by social deficits, communication difficulties, stereotyped or repetitive behaviours and interests, and in some cases, cognitive delays. What are the signs and symptoms of Autism? Autism (or ASD) is a wide-spectrum disorder and children with autism often vary in the severity and range of signs and symptoms. As well as experiencing varying combinations of symptoms, some people will have mild symptoms while others will have severe ones. Onset: Overt symptoms gradually begin after the age of six months, become established by age two or three years and tend to continue through adulthood. Autism is distinguished by a characteristic triad of symptoms: impairments in social interaction; impairments in communication; and restricted interests and repetitive behaviour. Other aspects, such as atypical eating, are also common but are not essential for diagnosis. Here is a detail list of Autism symptoms. Social Skills – signs and symptoms Very little or no eye contact. Resistance to being held or touched. Tends to get too close when speaking to someone (lack of personal space). Responds to social interactions, but does not initiate them. Does not generally share observations or experiences with others. Difficulty understanding jokes, figures of speech or sarcasm. Difficulty reading facial expressions and body language. Difficulty understanding the rules of conversation. Difficulty understanding group interactions. Seems unable to understand another’s feelings. Prefers to be alone, aloft. Unaware of/disinterested in what is going on around them. Talks excessively about one or two topics. Minimal acknowledgement of others. Language Development – signs and symptoms Abnormal use of pitch, intonation, rhythm or stress while speaking. Speech is abnormally loud or quiet. Difficulty whispering. Repeats last words or phrases several times.  Makes verbal sounds while listening (echolalia). Often uses short, incomplete sentences. Speech started very early and then stopped for a period of time. Difficulty understanding directional terms (front, back, before, after). Behaviour – signs and symptoms Obsessions with objects, ideas or desires. Ritualistic or compulsive behaviour patterns (sniffing, licking, watching objects fall, flapping arms, spinning, rocking, humming, tapping, sucking, rubbing clothes). Fascination with rotation. Play is often repetitive. Unusual attachment to objects. Perfectionism in certain areas. Inability to perceive potentially dangerous situations. Emotions – signs and symptoms Sensitivity or lack of sensitivity to sounds, textures (touch), tastes, smells or light. Difficulty with loud or sudden sounds. Resists change in the environment (people, places, objects). Calmed by external stimulation – soothing sound, brushing, rotating object, constant pressure. Learning Development – signs and symptoms Exceptionally high skills in some areas and very low in others. Excellent rote memory in some areas. Difficulty with reading comprehension (can quote an answer, but unable to predict, summarize or find symbolism). Difficulty with fine motor activities (colouring, printing, scissors, gluing). Short attention span for most lessons. Resistance or inability to follow directions. Difficulty transitioning from one activity to another in school. Locomotor Skills – signs and symptoms Walks on toes. Unusual gait. Difficulty changing from one floor surface to another (carpet to wood, sidewalk to grass). Difficulty moving through a space (bumps into objects or people). Gross motor skills are developmentally behind peers(riding a bike, skating, running). Fine motor skills are developmentally behind peers(hand writing, tying shoes, scissors).   When should you get your child evaluated for Autism or ASD? If your child has any of these delays or behaviour, consult your pediatrician asap for evaluation and treatment of autism or asd: No babbling by 9 months No pointing or gestures by 12 months Not responding to their name by 12 months of age No single words by 16 months Lack of pretend play by 18 months No two-word phrases by 24 months Any loss of language or social skills at any age Your infant or child resists cuddling and doesn’t respond to his or her environment or to other people Your child bangs his or her head or demonstrates self-injurious behaviour or aggression on a regular basis Your child demonstrates unusually repetitive behaviour, such as repeatedly opening and closing doors or turning a toy car upside down and repeatedly spinning its wheels Autism diagnosis is usually clinical, but special tools like Childhood Autism Rating Scale are available that help in diagnosing autism, assessing its severity and differentiating it from other developmental disorders. How prevalent is Autism? Incidence and Epidemiology of Autism. Autism is approaching the numbers of an epidemic. The figures are staggering—in the 1960s, four in 10, 000 children had autism. Today, according to Autism Speaks, an organization dedicated to autism,  one in every 110 children is diagnosed with autism. Different studies in different countries have found a prevalence rates between 3/10000 to 40/10000. U.S. government statistics suggest the prevalence rate of autism is increasing 10-17% annually. Boys are nearly five times more likely than girls to have autism. Based on the evidence reviewed in a study published in 2012, the median of prevalence estimates of autism spectrum disorders was 62/10 000 (1). USA: Most recent reviews tend to estimate a prevalence of 1–2 per 1, 000 for autism and close to 6 per 1, 000 for ASD and 11 per 1, 000 children in the United States for ASD as of 2008. CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network’s most recent estimate is that 1 out of every 59 children, or 16.9 per 1, 000, have some form of ASD as of 2014. UK: There are around 700, 000 people on the autism spectrum in the UK – that’s more than 1 in 100. The latest prevalence studies (2012) of autism indicate that 1.1% of the population in the UK may be on the autism spectrum. A 2006 study of nearly 57, 000 British nine- and ten-year-olds reported a prevalence of 3.89 per 1, 000 for autism and 11.61 per 1, 000 for ASD; these higher figures could be associated with broadening diagnostic criteria. Canada: The rate of autism diagnoses in Canada was 1 in 450 in 2003. However, preliminary results of an epidemiological study conducted at Montreal Children’s Hospital in the 2003-2004 school year found a prevalence rate of 0.68% (or 1 per 147). The current prevalence rate is estimated to be 1 in 66. India : The estimates till 2016 estimated that there are 20 lakh ( 2 million) individuals in India suffering from Autism/ASD using the extrapolated prevalence figures of 1/250 to 1/500. However, recent studies ( done by the International Clinical Epidemiology Network Trust) suspect a prevalence rate of 1-1.5% or 1 in 66 children between the age of 2 and 9. This takes the affected children count to close to 10 million (1 crore)!!   Why does Autism occur? What causes Autism? The exact cause of autism is still not known. Recent research on Autismindicates that it could be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental factors could be a variety of conditions affecting brain development, which can occur before, during or soon after birth. Click here to see all the latest research papers related to Autism. 1 in 20 children with autism also has Fragile X Syndrome.  Is there a role of vaccines in causing Autism? ASD & Vaccine Damage controversy. Over the years, many people have had concerns that autism might be linked to the vaccines children receive. One vaccine ingredient that has been studied specifically isThimerosal, used as a preservative in many recommended childhood vaccines. MMR vaccine has also been linked with Autism frequently. The main reason people talk about vaccines and autism is that some parents have noticed changes in children shortly after the children were vaccinated. Their kids seemed to be developing normally, then suddenly stopped interacting with people and lost language abilities — a condition called “regressive” autism. The American Academy of Paediatrics, the CDC, the World Health Organization, and the Institute of Medicine all agree that there’s probably no relationship between autism and vaccines. But if the case is that solid, why do so many people remain unconvinced? There are a number of websites giving information about vaccine damage in kids. YouTube also has dozens of testimonial videos from parents who believe their children developed autism after vaccination. Their beliefs may have been validated in March 2008 when federal officials said that a Georgia girl was entitled to compensation because vaccines may have aggravated an underlying condition, causing autism-like symptoms (2). In 2013, an Italian court also ruled in favour of the Bocca family, whose nine-year-old son became autistic after receiving the MMR vaccine (3). New evidence suggesting a link between the MMR vaccine and autism have emerged recently.Scientists reported finding a strong association between the vaccine and an immune system reaction which is thought to play a role in autism. The team led by Dr Vijendra Singh analyzed blood samples from 125 autistic children and 92 children who did not have the disorder. In 75 of the autistic children they found antibodies showing there had been an abnormal reaction to the measles component of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (4). Nine out of ten of those children were also positive for antibodies thought to be involved in autism. These antibodies attack the brain by targeting the basic building blocks of myelin, the insulating sheath that covers nerve fibres. This stops the nerves developing properly and may affect brain functions. None of the non-autistic children showed the unusual anti-measles response. Dr Singh has suggested that an abnormal immune response may be the root cause of many cases of autism. Dr Singh’s team, who worked at Utah State University in the U.S., report their findings in the latest issue of the Journal of Biomedical Science (5). They say: ‘Stemming from this evidence, we suggest that an inappropriate antibody response to MMR, specifically the measles component thereof, might be related to pathogenesis of autism.’ In June 2013, scientists and physicians from Wake Forest University, New York, and Venezuela, reported findings that not only confirm the presence of intestinal disease in children with autism and intestinal symptoms, but also indicate that this disease may be novel. Using sophisticated laboratory methods Dr. Steve Walker and his colleagues endorsed Wakefield’s original findings (6) by showing molecular changes in the children’s intestinal tissues that were highly distinctive and clearly abnormal (7). Another new study shows a direct link between standard childhood vaccination series, MMR, and autism-like symptoms in monkeys. The principal scientist involved in the study, Dr. Laura Hewitson of the University of Pittsburgh, presented the alarming conclusions as an abstract pending publication at the International Meeting for Autism Research. It has been presented at scientific conferences in both London and Seattle, USA. The study compared vaccinated macaque monkeys with non-vaccinated macaques. The vaccines included the popular MMR series. The study found a marked increase in “gastrointestinal tissue gene expression” and “inflammation issues” with those monkeys which received vaccinations (8). They are a common symptom of children with regressive autism. The study also found marked behaviour changes and development differences in those monkeys given the vaccines versus those who were not. “Compared with unexposed animals, significant neuro-developmental deficits were evident for exposed animals in survival reflexes, tests of color discrimination and reversal, and learning sets, ” the study`s authors reported. “Differences in behaviours were observed between exposed and unexposed animals and within the exposed group before and after MMR vaccination.” (8) Despite these recent research studies, the scientific community remains divided about vaccine-autism relation. As informed parents, you need to make your own choice. Here is a list of studies that have raised questions about vaccine efficacy and safety:   What is the treatment available for ASD, Autism? Autism treatment includes intensive, sustained special education programs and behavior therapy early in life can help children acquire self-care, social, and job skills often improve functioning and decrease symptom severity and maladaptive behaviours. Available approaches for autism treatment include applied behaviour analysis (ABA), developmental models,  structured teaching,  speech and language therapy,  social skills therapy, and occupational therapy. In conventional medicine, many medications are used to treat ASD symptoms that interfere with integrating a child into home or school when behavioral treatment fails. More than half of US children diagnosed with ASD are prescribed psychoactive drugs or anticonvulsants, with the most common drug classes being antidepressants, stimulants, and antipsychotics. All these medicines have their own side effects and they should be used for autism treatment only after weighing the pros and cons with your physician. There are many alternative therapies that parents often use to treat their autistic children. These include naturopathy, homeopathy, ayuerveda, hydrotherapy, orthomolecular medicine etc. For most of these CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) modalities, there is lot of anecdotal evidence but most therapies have not been tested on a large scale in a scientific manner. Hence there is little or no evidence either for or against such therapies. Any CAM treatment for Autism symptoms should only be taken from a certified practitioner in that CAM modality.  Is there Homeopathy treatment for Autism? Homeopathy is one of the most popular alternative systems of medicine. Homeopathy is recognized by dozens of National governments as effective medical modality. There are tens of millions of patients across the world using homeopathy. There are increasing number of clinical and laboratory studies, not just on humans, but also on animals and plants, which have demonstrated the effectiveness of potentised homeopathic remedies. Homeopathic medicine is one of the most popular alternative systems used for Autism treatment. There are several books and websites dedicated to providing information about homeopathic treatment of Autism. YouTube also has many videos from parents giving positive testimonials of homeopathic treatment for their children. Homeopathy is a safe and gentle system of healing, which tries to identify the root cause of any problem by taking a detail case history, which includes the current complaints of the patient, his/he past medical history, family history, nature and disposition of the patient and many other finer factors. Homeopathy is practiced in two forms – classical and complex. In classical homeopathy, the homeopathic doctor takes a detail case history, tries to identify the root or exciting cause of an illness, and prescribed a single homeopathic remedy at a time to the patient. In complex homeopathy many medicines for a given condition are mixed in a bottle and given at a time. Classical Homeopathy is the pure form of homeopathy and offers deep and lasting cures. When you consult a classical homeopath for homeopathy treatment of autism, he will note the full case history of your child. This will include your child’s current medical complaints, their onset, modalities, past medical history, mother’s history during pregnancy, family history, exploration of any stress points or causes for current illness, and  a detail assessment of your child’s mental and emotional makeup. After this exhaustive case history and analysis, the homeopath identifies a homeopathic medicine that covers your child’s asd symptoms and condition the best. Such a remedy, when well selected, can bring significant changes in many difficult and inveterate cases. Does diet and nutrition play any role in Autism? Many therapists recommend large dose supplements of Vitamin B, Vitamin C, Zinc and Fish oil. Casein free and Gluten free diets have also been suggested by many. Please consult your physician before making any dietary modifications.   What is CEASE Therapy for Autism? CEASE therapy is a form of homeopathy treatment for autism, which was developed by Dutch physician Tinus Smits who was looking for a way to help children with autism. CEASE stands for Complete Elimination Autism Spectrum Expression and Dr. Smits helped well over 300 children with Autism prior to his death in 2010. While his method was originally designed for children with autism, Dr. Smits and those that he trained have experienced success treating a number of conditions including MS, Chronic Fatigue, allergies, ear infections, hyperactivity, and detoxification. It is a combination of Isotherapy (a form of Homeopathy) and Orthomolecular medicine (nutritional supplements in therapeutic doses to nourish the brain and restore proper intestinal function, esp supplements of Vitamin C, Vitamin B, Zinc, Omega 3 Fatty acids). In Dr. Smits experience, autism is an accumulation of different causes and about 70% is due to vaccines, 25% to toxic medication and other toxic substances, 5% to some diseases. With isotherapy, a form of homeopathy using the causative substances themselves in homeopathic preparation, the toxic imprints can be erased. In CEASE Therapy, step by step all causative factors (vaccines, regular medication, environmental toxic exposures, effects of illness, etc.) are detoxified with the homeopathically prepared, that is diluted and potentized substances that are implicated in the cause of autism.
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      https://youtu.be/qcMAKlgARRw -Select Category-  ABA Therapists  Animal Assisted Therapists  Aquatic Therapists  Art/Dance/Music Therapists  Autism Associations  Autism Centres  Autism Forums  Autism Foundations  Autism NGOs  Autism Societies   Autism support groups  Autism Trusts  Behavioural Intervention and Therapy Centers  Charities for Autism  Clinical Psychologists  Dietician  Donate Them Directly  Neurophysicians  Neurosurgeons  Nutritionists Dieticians  Occupational Therapists  Organisation Support Groups  Organizations and Forums  Parent Support Groups  Pediatric Neurologists  Pediatricians  Physiotherapists  Psychiatrists  Psychologists  Rehabilitation Centres  Social Groups & Clubs for Autism  Special Educators  Special Schools  Speech Language Therapists  Stem Cell Therapy Centers    SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS ASD is a heterogeneous disorder i.e. no two individuals on the spectrum will have the same set of signs and symptoms. The severity and range of symptoms are highly variable. However, the symptoms or difficulties can be classified into core domains such as difficulty in social interactions, communication deficits, behavioral issues and unusual interests and certain physical attributes. An individual may present with anyone, or a combination of or all of these difficulties/symptoms. Signs and symptoms usually become noticeable in the first three years of life. This section details the range of these signs and symptoms which are usually observed in individuals with autism.
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    Understanding Autism What Is Autism? Autism is a complex neurobehavioral condition that includes impairments in social interaction and developmental language and communication skills combined with rigid, repetitive behaviors. Because of the range of symptoms, this condition is now called autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It covers a large spectrum of symptoms, skills, and levels of impairment. ASD ranges in severity from a handicap that somewhat limits an otherwise normal life to a devastating disability that may require institutional care. Children with autism have trouble communicating. They have trouble understanding what other people think and feel. This makes it very hard for them to express themselves either with words or through gestures, facial expressions, and touch. ADVERTISEMENT A child with ASD who is very sensitive may be greatly troubled -- sometimes even pained -- by sounds, touches, smells, or sights that seem normal to others. Children who are autistic may have repetitive, stereotyped body movements such as rocking, pacing, or hand flapping. They may have unusual responses to people, attachments to objects, resistance to change in their routines, or aggressive or self-injurious behavior. At times they may seem not to notice people, objects, or activities in their surroundings. Some children with autism may also develop seizures. And in some cases, those seizures may not occur until adolescence. CONTINUE READING BELOW Some people with autism are cognitively impaired to a degree. In contrast to more typical cognitive impairment, which is characterized by relatively even delays in all areas of development, people with autism show uneven skill development. They may have problems in certain areas, especially the ability to communicate and relate to others. But they may have unusually developed skills in other areas, such as drawing, creating music, solving math problems, or memorizing facts. For this reason, they may test higher -- perhaps even in the average or above-average range -- on nonverbal intelligence tests. Symptoms of autism typically appears during the first three years of life. Some children show signs from birth. Others seem to develop normally at first, only to slip suddenly into symptoms when they are 18 to 36 months old. However, it is now recognized that some individuals may not show symptoms of a communication disorder until demands of the environment exceed their capabilities. Autism is four times more common in boys than in girls. It knows no racial, ethnic, or social boundaries. Family income, lifestyle, or educational levels do not affect a child's chance of being autistic. CONTINUE READING BELOW Autism is said to be increasing; however, it is not entirely clear whether the increase is related to changes in how it is diagnosed or whether it is a true increase in the incidence of the disease. Autism is just one syndrome that now falls under the heading of autism spectrum disorders.  Previous disorders that are now classified under the umbrella diagnosis of  ASD or a social communication disorder include: Autistic disorder. This is what most people think of when they hear the word "autism." It refers to problems with social interactions, communication, and imaginative play in children younger than 3 years. Asperger's syndrome. These children don't have a problem with language -- in fact, they tend to score in the average or above-average range on intelligence tests. But they have the same social problems and limited scope of interests as children with autistic disorder. Pervasive developmental disorder or PDD -- also known as atypical autism. This is a kind of catch-all category for children who have some autistic behaviors but who don't fit into other categories. Childhood disintegrative disorder.These children develop normally for at least two years and then lose some or most of their communication and social skills. This is an extremely rare disorder and its existence as a separate condition is a matter of debate among many mental healthprofessionals. CONTINUE READING BELOW Rett syndrome previously fell under ASD spectrum but it is now confirmed that Rett’s cause is genetic. It no longer falls under ASD guidelines. Children with Rett syndrome, primarily girls, start developing normally but then begin losing their communication and social skills. Beginning at the age of 1 to 4 years, repetitive hand movements replace purposeful use of the hands. Children with Rett syndrome are usually severely cognitively impaired.
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