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    AutismTherapies & ser
    Autism Therapies & services Therapies & interventions Early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder: getting started 0-18 years A A Share  Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) benefit from early intervention – the earlier, the better. It’s important that you do as much as you can for your child, as soon as you can. But if you’re still reeling from a diagnosis, it can be hard to know where and how to start. Early intervention for autism spectrum disorder What to look for in an early intervention for autism spectrum disorder Getting started with early intervention service providers Choosing trustworthy early intervention service providers How to find out more about early intervention People living in National Disability Insurance Scheme roll out areas have different intervention and support options from those outside the roll out areas. If you live in a roll out area, your child will get early intervention through the NDIS. Early intervention for autism spectrum disorder Early intervention refers to doing things as early as possible to work on your child’s autism spectrum disorder (ASD) characteristics. Early intervention for children with ASD is made up of therapies or interventions and services. Therapies (also called interventions) are the programs or sessions aimed at helping your child’s development. Services are the places and organisations that offer these therapies. A service might offer one therapy or several types of therapies. Starting intervention as young as possible is most effective in helping the development of children with ASD. You can even get things started before your child has a formal diagnosis. For example, problems with communication are a big cause of tantrums and other difficult behaviour for children with ASD. If children can’t communicate their needs or understand others, they express themselves or get attention with difficult behaviour. But if they learn to communicate effectively as early as possible, they won’t need to behave like this quite so much. Another reason for starting early is that it can help children with early brain development – the brains of children with ASD develop differently from their peers. What to look for in an early intervention for autism spectrum disorder All therapies and services for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) should be family centred, well structured and based on good evidence. Here’s a list of things to look for when choosing an early intervention. The more of these things you find in a service the better, but not all interventions will do all these things. Family-centred  The intervention or service: includes family members so you can work alongside the professionals and learn how to help your child is flexible – it can be offered at home as well as in other settings like kindergartens and early intervention centres provides your family with support and guidance. Well-structured  The intervention or service: has staff who are specially trained in the intervention and services they provide develops an individual plan for your child and reviews the plan regularly monitors your child’s progress with regular assessments is highly structured, well organised, regular and predictable provides a supportive learning environment – your child feels comfortable and supported prepares and supports your child for the move to school enables contact between your child and typically developing children (ideally of the same age). Evidence-based  The intervention or service: is designed for children with ASD  focuses on developing attention, communication, listening, imitation, language and social skills includes strategies to help your child learn new skills and use them in different settings (sometimes called ‘generalising’ skills) identifies what the ‘purpose’ of a difficult behaviour is, and teaches your child more appropriate alternative behaviour to replace it. You can print out a checklist of these characteristics of a good early intervention service (PDF: 39kb). Other things to consider  Intensive early intervention for children with ASD is most effective. It’s not just about the hours, though – it’s also about the quality of those hours and how the therapy engages your child. It can be scary when you first find out what an early intervention therapy or service costs in time and money. Still, try not to panic. Instead try to focus on what you want for your child and your family. Learn all you can about the available options. How will they help your child? What will they cost in dollars and time? What funding is available to help cover these costs? Different children with ASD respond in different ways to interventions, so no single program will suit all children and their families.  Video Finding and starting early intervention for autism spectrum disorder In this short video, parents talk about finding and starting early intervention for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They share their experiences with interventions and tests. There are many excellent resources and interventions available, but these parents say it’s important to choose interventions based on scientific evidence. Getting started with early intervention service providers To begin with, find out all you can about your early intervention options. Three questions will help you get started: What did the professionals who diagnosed your child recommend? The assessment or diagnosis should help you understand your child’s current skills and possible gaps in skills or development. It should also include a treatment plan you can take to service providers. What relevant service providers are in your area? You can get a list of local services from your autism advisor. What do you know about the interventions these service providers offer? Learn more about types of interventions. Choosing trustworthy early intervention service providers The most important thing.... How to find out more about early intervention If you need more information about a service you’re considering, try the following: 936541055, +919008361473, 9738838733...
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    Understanding Autism
    Understanding Autism What Is Autism? Autism is a complex neurobehavioral condition that includes impairments in social interaction and developmental language and communication skills combined with rigid, repetitive behaviors. Because of the range of symptoms, this condition is now called autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It covers a large spectrum of symptoms, skills, and levels of impairment. ASD ranges in severity from a handicap that somewhat limits an otherwise normal life to a devastating disability that may require institutional care. Children with autism have trouble communicating. They have trouble understanding what other people think and feel. This makes it very hard for them to express themselves either with words or through gestures, facial expressions, and touch. ADVERTISEMENT A child with ASD who is very sensitive may be greatly troubled -- sometimes even pained -- by sounds, touches, smells, or sights that seem normal to others. Children who are autistic may have repetitive, stereotyped body movements such as rocking, pacing, or hand flapping. They may have unusual responses to people, attachments to objects, resistance to change in their routines, or aggressive or self-injurious behavior. At times they may seem not to notice people, objects, or activities in their surroundings. Some children with autism may also develop seizures. And in some cases, those seizures may not occur until adolescence. CONTINUE READING BELOW Some people with autism are cognitively impaired to a degree. In contrast to more typical cognitive impairment, which is characterized by relatively even delays in all areas of development, people with autism show uneven skill development. They may have problems in certain areas, especially the ability to communicate and relate to others. But they may have unusually developed skills in other areas, such as drawing, creating music, solving math problems, or memorizing facts. For this reason, they may test higher -- perhaps even in the average or above-average range -- on nonverbal intelligence tests. Symptoms of autism typically appears during the first three years of life. Some children show signs from birth. Others seem to develop normally at first, only to slip suddenly into symptoms when they are 18 to 36 months old. However, it is now recognized that some individuals may not show symptoms of a communication disorder until demands of the environment exceed their capabilities. Autism is four times more common in boys than in girls. It knows no racial, ethnic, or social boundaries. Family income, lifestyle, or educational levels do not affect a child's chance of being autistic. CONTINUE READING BELOW Autism is said to be increasing; however, it is not entirely clear whether the increase is related to changes in how it is diagnosed or whether it is a true increase in the incidence of the disease. Autism is just one syndrome that now falls under the heading of autism spectrum disorders.  Previous disorders that are now classified under the umbrella diagnosis of  ASD or a social communication disorder include: Autistic disorder. This is what most people think of when they hear the word "autism." It refers to problems with social interactions, communication, and imaginative play in children younger than 3 years. Asperger's syndrome. These children don't have a problem with language -- in fact, they tend to score in the average or above-average range on intelligence tests. But they have the same social problems and limited scope of interests as children with autistic disorder. Pervasive developmental disorder or PDD -- also known as atypical autism. This is a kind of catch-all category for children who have some autistic behaviors but who don't fit into other categories. Childhood disintegrative disorder.These children develop normally for at least two years and then lose some or most of their communication and social skills. This is an extremely rare disorder and its existence as a separate condition is a matter of debate among many mental healthprofessionals. CONTINUE READING BELOW Rett syndrome previously fell under ASD spectrum but it is now confirmed that Rett’s cause is genetic. It no longer falls under ASD guidelines. Children with Rett syndrome, primarily girls, start developing normally but then begin losing their communication and social skills. Beginning at the age of 1 to 4 years, repetitive hand movements replace purposeful use of the hands. Children with Rett syndrome are usually severely cognitively impaired.
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     	https://youtu.be/qcMAK
      https://youtu.be/qcMAKlgARRw -Select Category-  ABA Therapists  Animal Assisted Therapists  Aquatic Therapists  Art/Dance/Music Therapists  Autism Associations  Autism Centres  Autism Forums  Autism Foundations  Autism NGOs  Autism Societies   Autism support groups  Autism Trusts  Behavioural Intervention and Therapy Centers  Charities for Autism  Clinical Psychologists  Dietician  Donate Them Directly  Neurophysicians  Neurosurgeons  Nutritionists Dieticians  Occupational Therapists  Organisation Support Groups  Organizations and Forums  Parent Support Groups  Pediatric Neurologists  Pediatricians  Physiotherapists  Psychiatrists  Psychologists  Rehabilitation Centres  Social Groups & Clubs for Autism  Special Educators  Special Schools  Speech Language Therapists  Stem Cell Therapy Centers    SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS ASD is a heterogeneous disorder i.e. no two individuals on the spectrum will have the same set of signs and symptoms. The severity and range of symptoms are highly variable. However, the symptoms or difficulties can be classified into core domains such as difficulty in social interactions, communication deficits, behavioral issues and unusual interests and certain physical attributes. An individual may present with anyone, or a combination of or all of these difficulties/symptoms. Signs and symptoms usually become noticeable in the first three years of life. This section details the range of these signs and symptoms which are usually observed in individuals with autism.
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    Autism What Is Autism?
    Autism What Is Autism? Within the sectionWhat is autism? About autism Fact Sheets Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Indicators of ASD in young children Home What is autism? What Is Autism? Autism is a lifelong developmental condition that affects, among other things, the way an individual relates to his or her environment and their interaction with other people. The word 'spectrum' describes the range of difficulties that people on the autism spectrum may experience and the degree to which they may be affected. Some people may be able to live relatively normal lives, while others may have an accompanying learning challenges and require continued specialist support. The main areas of difficulty are in social communication, social interaction and restricted or repetitive behaviours and interests. People on the autism spectrum may also have: unusual sensory interests such as sniffing objects or staring intently at moving objects sensory sensitivities including avoiding everyday sounds and textures such as hair dryers, vacuum cleaners and sand intellectual impairment or learning difficulties An estimated one in 100 people has autism; that’s almost 230, 000 Australians. Autism affects almost four times as many boys than girls. For an interesting read on the perceived increase in the prevlence and/or diagnosis of Autism,  click here to read a Blog by Vicki Gibbs, Aspect National Manager of Research and Assessments.   Looking for more information? Download our quick guide to autism. Read More   “ What would happen if the autism gene was eliminated from the gene pool? You would have a bunch of people standing around in a cave, chatting and socializing and not getting anything done. ”— Temple Grandin Browse Related research Early intervention focus All research evidence supports that early intervention makes a significant difference for children with autism. Getting the news that your child has autism can be confronting, and families need help to be able to support their child, explains Aspect Senior Manager Early Intervention, Rachel Kerslake." Download Aspect Practice Conversations 5 newsletter and podcast which focuses on Early Intervention. No upcoming related events found. © 2018 Autism Spectrum
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    Learn to play , 😍 play t
    Learn to play , 😍 play to learn 🤩  SOCIAL SKILLS GROUP THERAPY Friendships and positive peer relationships are an extremely important part of a child’s healthy development. Consequently, social rejection and lack of peer support can be a devastating experience for children and adolescents, impacting their school functioning and even future relationships. Social Skills Group Therapy consists of small groups of three to six children, ranging in ages 4 to 16. Children are grouped by age and ability and therapy consists of interactive group activities aimed at developing skills and confidence based on each child’s strengths and weaknesses within a supportive peer context. While each group is uniquely designed and scheduled in accordance with the selected participants, sessions typically run weekly for an 8-week period and meet for an hour to 1 1/2 hours, and include a parent feedback/training component throughout the sessions. All groups are led by a clinical psychologist and co-therapist. Social Skills Groups are generally appropriate for children with difficulties in the following areas: shyness, social isolation, adjustment disorders, ADHD, learning disorders and other social or behavioral difficulties. Special groups are arranged for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). Research shows that social skills training can help children progress across various areas of functioning by: Building Self-Esteem/Confidence Communicating Effectively Reading Social Cues Increasing Problem-Solving Understanding Perspective Taking Managing Stress/Anxiety Emphasizing Cooperation Child Early Intervention Sri prakruthi UPCOMING EVENTS Health is wealth events. View Calendar THERAPY DEPARTMENTS Behaviour intervention Group intervention Home schooling Shadow services Speech Academics Play therapy Physio Sensory FOUNDERS’ MESSAGE Welcome to Child Early Intervention Medical Center (CEIMC) and Child Learning and Enrichment Medical Center (CLEMC). We would like to welcome you, not only as professionals, but as parents as well. We understand the frustration and stress that affects every family with a child on the autism spectrum or with developmental delays. CONTACT US Sri prakruthi 9738838733/9008361473/9036541055
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    SPECIAL NEEDSWhat It
    SPECIAL NEEDS What It Means When a Child Has Special Needs Challenges and Triumphs Each Family Has Different Concerns Medical Issues Behavior Issues Developmental Issues VIEW ALL  Special needs is an umbrella term for a wide array of diagnoses, from those that resolve quickly to those that will be a challenge for life and those that are relatively mild to those that are profound. It covers developmental delays, medical conditions, psychiatric conditions, and congenital conditions that require accommodations so children can reach their potentials. No matter the reason, the designation is useful. It can help you obtain needed services, set appropriate goals, and gain an understanding of your child and the stresses your family may face. Challenges and Triumphs Special needs are commonly defined by what a child can't do—milestones unmet, foods banned, activities avoided, or experiences denied. These hindrances can hit families hard and may make special needs seem like a tragic designation. Healthy Little Monsters Get diet and wellness tips to help your kids stay healthy and happy. ONE-TAP SIGN UP Some parents will always mourn their child's lost potential, and some conditions become more troubling with time. Other families may find that their child's challenges make triumphs sweeter and that weaknesses are often accompanied by amazing strengths. Each Family Has Different Concerns Pick any two families of children with special needs and they may seem to have little in common. A family dealing with developmental delays will have different concerns than one dealing with chronic illness. These families will have different anxieties than one dealing with mental illness, learning problems, or behavioral challenges. Special needs is a very broad term and every situation is unique. Families should focus on seeking the help and guidance needed for their particular concerns. Medical Issues Medical issues for children include serious conditions like cancer, heart defects, muscular dystrophy, and cystic fibrosis. It also includes chronic conditions like asthma and diabetes, congenital conditions like cerebral palsy and dwarfism, and health threats like food allergies and obesity. A child may need frequent medical testing, hospital stays, equipment, and accommodations for disabilities. Establishing a good support system is very important when dealing with the uncertainty and any medical crises. Behavior Issues Children with behavior issues may not respond to traditional discipline. Diagnoses like ADHD,  fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), dysfunction of sensory integration, and Tourette's syndrome require specialized strategies that are tailored to their specific needs. Behavior issues can increase the risk for problems at school. As a parent, you will need to be flexible, creative, and patient. Developmental Issues Developmental disabilities can change your visions of the future and provide immediate difficulties in caring for and educating your child. Diagnoses like autism,  Down syndrome, and intellectual disabilities often cause children to be removed from the mainstream. Quite often, parents become fierce advocates to make sure their children receive the services, therapy,  schooling,  and inclusion they need and deserve. Learning Issues Children with learning disabilities like dyslexia and auditory processing disorder (APD) struggle with schoolwork regardless of their intellectual abilities. They require specialized learning strategies to meet their potential and avoid self-esteem problems and behavioral difficulties. Parents of learning-challenged kids need to be persistent. This includes working with your child at home as well as teachers and schools to ensure they get all the help they need. Mental Health Issues Realizing that your child suffers from anxiety or depression or has attachment difficulties can be unexpected. Again, every child will be different, yet these can leave your family dealing with a roller coaster of mood swings, crises, and defiance. It's important that parents find the right professionals to help. You will also need to make decisions about therapy, medications, and, possibly,  hospitalization. A Word From Verywell Although every special needs child is different and every family is unique, there are some common concerns that link parents. These include getting appropriate care and promoting acceptance in the extended family, school, and community. For some, planning for an uncertain future may be necessary. You will also find yourself adjusting routines and expectations, sometimes quite often. Out of necessity, parents of children with special needs are often more flexible, compassionate, stubborn, and resilient than other parents. While it may not be something you had hoped for or expected, it is important for your child that you try to do your best. You can take comfort in the fact that you're not alone, so feel comfortable reaching out for support.
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    YOGA | LIFESTYLEYOGA
     YOGA | LIFESTYLE YOGA GENERATES HUGE BENEFITS FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM Yoga is growing in popularity , as a complementary therapy for children with special needs and autism, with rising numbers of schools and parents participating in innovative yoga programs which are cropping up around the country. Scott Anderson, teacher and founder of YogAutism, mentions on his site that in addition to benefits typically associated with yoga—improved strength and flexibility, and an increasing sense of peace—autistic children also experience a reduction of pain, anxiety, aggression, obsessive behaviors, and self-stimulatory activities. And there's more good news. The children are also having greater success making new friends and regulating emotions.  Yoga is growing in popularity in the U.S. as a complementary therapy for children with special needs and autism. Louise Goldberg, author of Yoga Therapy for Children with Autism and Special Needs, also has first-hand experience witnessing the enormous benefits children on the autistic spectrum experience from practicing yoga. In 1981, Goldberg and a colleague were invited to teach a demo class for teachers at a residential hospital for children with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. “We were both fairly new yoga teachers and we just made it up as we went along. But seeing the kids—many of whom were extremely anxious, withdrawn, or angry—let go, for even a moment, was a revelation. We were amazed at how effective yoga was with these children and how much they enjoyed it, ” says Goldberg. Anxiety and Yoga Children with autism have very different sensory experiences from other people, and these responses often cause their bodies to get stuck in fight, flight, or freeze modes that divert blood from the digestive organs to the skeletal muscles. This activity results in disrupted digestion, increased heart rate, and shallower breathing—all of which readily provoke anxiety. Practicing his floating on a cloud (shavasana), he was able to self-regulate and calm his emotions, ” explains Goldberg. “I had a student, a little boy who got very, very anxious if the school bus was late. His mother drove him to school everyday and one day she saw him lying down in the back seat of the car, and she asked him, 'Are you sick?' He responded, 'No, I am relaxing.' The mother said she had never seen him so calm. Practicing his floating on a cloud (shavasana), he was able to self-regulate and calm his emotions, ” explains Goldberg. The Importance of Visualization Autism educators often highlight the importance of visualization practices, so Goldberg designed the program Stop and Relax, which uses over 50 cue cards to help children visualize the pose they are supposed to take. Through this visualization, they are able to successfully imitate and model physical actions and postures they would not have been able to previously.  “Some of the kids don’t speak—don’t have language—but they can look at a visual cue card and respond. Some children also have trouble engaging, even if they can achieve fluid sentences and can perform motor planning. However, they don’t have the kind of motor planning skills like going from point A to point B to point C. But on seeing the visual cue, somehow it triggers something in their brain and they can replicate it, ” she explains. Resistance to the Word "Yoga" When Goldberg started teaching her specialized yoga classes for children with autism, she received some resistance from parents and schools, as some people didn’t feel comfortable with the word "yoga." “I think some people around the U.S. were a little bit narrow-minded. Some even thought it was a cult, ” she explained. "One thing that I want to impart here is that yoga, as it’s practiced in public schools, is not a religious practice. The postures and breathing exercises, the relaxation techniques and self-regulation tools, can be culled from yoga’s vast well of resources to be implemented in a public school curriculum." This program is applicable to all children and ages, as it is just another form of movement involving exercise, mindfulness, and breathing. Goldberg now uses the name "Creative Relaxation, " and takes yoga poses and applies them to challenges that children have in either their school or everyday lives. This program is applicable to all children and ages, as it is just another form of movement involving exercise, mindfulness, and breathing. “The idea is that when we are in a school, we don’t use any Sanskrit names. We don’t call it the prayer pose. We call it the tree pose. Viparita shalabhasana is our Superman pose. I don’t want anyone to feel that it is religious. We don’t do any chanting. When we sing, it’s just generic songs.” Goldberg believes that all children would benefit from yoga practice in school classes. “Ten years ago, when I was teaching in a school, I had a chance to go into all the classes which had a child with autism and I taught the whole group. It wasn’t just the one child that benefited from this. Everyone did, ” she explains with a smile.
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     SRI PRAKRUTHISigns, S
     SRI PRAKRUTHI Signs, Symptoms, & Characteristics of ASD Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) can be noticed in an infant as early as 8-10 months of age, and these infants may exhibit symptoms such as not recognizing their name when called, delayed babbling and not having an interest in people. The symptoms of ASD are likely to become more apparent as the child gets older and some symptoms may not be noticeable until the child is 2 years old. Symptoms in toddler may include a preference to play alone, difficulty with engaging with peers and a failure to imitate the actions of others. There are some children with ASD who appear to be developing at a normal rate, but around 18-24 months, they no longer are gaining new skills and they start to lose the skills they already had. Studies have shown that approximately 80%-90% of parents noticed symptoms of ASD by the time their child was 2 years old. Other symptoms of children with ASD include: Avoiding eye contact Becoming upset with small changes Having obsessive interests Failure to point at objects Showing unusual reactions to the sound, smell, look, feel and taste of things  Some children who do not have ASD may also experience these symptoms. ASD does require a medical diagnosis. Some children who have ASD may have other symptoms too. These include: Aggressive behavior Causing self-injury Hyperactive Impulsivity Lack of fear Short attention span Temper tantrums Unusual eating habits LOCATION Hennru bande and Akshaya Nagar CONTACT US 9036541055/9008361473/9738838733
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    Call us 9036541055/900836
    Call us 9036541055/9008361473/9738838733 ....... Sri prakruthi Speech-language pathology Speech-language pathology is a field of expertise practiced by a clinician known as a speech-language pathologist (SLP), also sometimes referred to as a speech and language therapist[1] or a speech therapist.SLP is considered a "related health profession" along with audiology, optometry,  occupational therapy,  clinical psychology,  physical therapy, and others. The field of SLP is distinguished from other "related health professions" as SLPs are legally permitted to diagnose certain disorders which fall within their scope of practice. SLPs specialize in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of communication disorders (speech disordersand language disorders), cognitive-communication disorders,  voice disorders, and swallowing disorders. SLPs also play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorder (often in a team with pediatricians and psychologists). Speech-Language A common misconception is that speech-language pathology is restricted to adjusting a speaker's speech sound articulation to meet the expected normal pronunciation, such as helping English speaking individuals enunciate the traditionally difficult "r". SLPs can also often help people who stutter to speak more fluently. Articulation and fluency are only two facets of the work of an SLP, however. In fact, speech-language pathology is concerned with a broad scope of speech, language, swallowing, and voice issues involved in communication, [2] some of which include: Word-finding and other semantic issues, either as a result of a specific language impairment (SLI) such as a language delay or as a secondary characteristic of a more general issue such as dementia. Social communication difficulties involving how people communicate or interact with others (pragmatics). Structural language impairments, including difficulties creating sentences that are grammatical (syntax) and modifying word meaning (morphology). Literacy impairments (reading and writing) related to the letter-to-sound relationship (phonics), the word-to-meaning relationship (semantics), and understanding the ideas presented in a text (reading comprehension). Voice difficulties, such as a raspy voice, a voice that is too soft, or other voice difficulties that negatively impact a person's social or professional performance. Cognitive impairments (e.g., attention, memory, executive function) to the extent that they interfere with communication. The components of speech production include: phonation (producing sound) resonance fluency Intonation Pitch variance; Voice (including aeromechanicalcomponents of respiration) The components of language include: Phonology (manipulating sound according to the rules of a language); Morphology (understanding components of words and how they can modify meaning); Syntax (constructing sentences according to the grammatical rules of a target language); Semantics (interpreting signs or symbols of communication such as words or signs to construct meaning); Pragmatics (social aspects of communication).[3] Primary pediatric speech and language disorders include: receptive and expressive language disorders,  speech sound disorders, childhood apraxia of speech (CAS),  stuttering, and language-based learning disabilities.[4]Speech pathologist not only work with adolescents with speech and language impediments, but also those that are elderly.
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